eLetters

167 e-Letters

  • TV's portrayal of driver distraction: Legitimising bad practice
    Tony H Reinhardt-Rutland

    McEvoy et al (2006) provide empirical evidence to support the case that distractions for the driver are an important feature of road crashes. There should be nothing too surprising in this; after all, many authorities recognise that an enforcible code of behaviour must be applied to public-service drivers; bus passengers are not likely to feel at ease with a driver whose attention deviates from the task in hand.

    ...

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  • Re: Alberta helmet article - logic problem and missing data . Authors reply.
    Brent Hagel

    Dear Editor,

    In response to our article, Burdett makes two main criticisms. The first relates to the issue of level of cycling activity in the community post-legislation. The second relates to our interpretation of the evidence for child cyclist helmet wearing when accompanying adults are helmeted compared with non-helmeted children. We consider these points separately.

    On the issue of the level of cycl...

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  • Alberta helmet article - logic problem and missing data
    Avery Burdett

    Dear Editor,

    In their report on bicycle helmet use[1], Hagel et al recommend that Alberta's child helmet law be extended to include adults. They base this on (a) an increase in the rate of helmet use among the age group affected (under 18 years of age) from two years before the introduction of helmet legislation in 2002 to two years after, and (b) children being observed riding at higher rates of helmet use when accompa...

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  • Important questions: effect on head injuries and cycle use?
    Dr Dorothy L Robinson

    Dear Editor,

    There is considerable debate about enforced helmet laws. Surveys in Australia counted several thousand cyclists before and after legislation, at the same sites, observation times and time of year. Percent helmet wearing (%HW) increased mainly because non-helmeted cyclists were discouraged from cycling – reductions in numbers counted were 2 to 15 times greater than the increases in numbers wearing helme...

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  • Studies of cyclist fatalities contradict the claims of Cummings et al.
    Dr Dorothy L Robinson

    Dear Editor,

    Cummings et al. assume that bike helmets prevent 65% of deaths.[1] Yet a study of cyclist crashes in Brisbane concluded that helmets would prevent very few fatalities. All deaths were caused by bike/motor vehicle collisions. For 13 of the 14 non-helmeted cyclists who died, there was no indication that a helmet would have made any difference. The authors were very concerned about brain da...

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  • MOTOCYCLE INJURIES AND HELMET USE IN NIGERIA
    Ime A John

    Dear Editor,

    It was not only fashionable but life saving for motorcyclists to use helmet while transiting in the 70s and 80s.Limited best practise based on knowledge couple with deteriorating standard of education and not only cost and warm climate may be the attributing factors resulting in the decline of helmet use in the present Nigeria.

    Also, cultural or perhaps religious reasons may explain the use...

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  • Is peer review in Injury Prevention better than random?
    Eric M. Ossiander

    Dear Editor,

    In an editorial [1], you presented data from a study of peer reviews of 20 randomly selected papers submitted to Injury Prevention. Each paper was independently reviewed by three reviewers, who score...

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  • Why stop at cyclists?
    Peter W Ward

    Dear Editor,

    The research letter from Vardy et al (1) seems to suggest that getting head teachers to lecture primary school kids about helmet-wearing made no difference to helmet-wearing rates among those attending hospital with cycling injuries. Neither did it alter the proportion of head injuries. But it was associated with a reduction in the total number of children attending hospital with cycling injuries...

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  • Faulty FARS bicycle helmet use data & implications for effectiveness
    David A. Lombardi, PhD

    Dear Editor and Authors,

    Dr. Geary makes a very important point regarding the validity of the data on the use or non-use of bicycle helmet use abstracted from FARS and recently published by Cummings, et al, in their June, 2006 paper. This issue is one of the most important limitations and challenges in the use of narrative analysis. We previously struggled with a similar issue in a study published in Injury P...

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  • Faulty FARS bicycle helmet use data & implications for effectiveness
    Riley R Geary

    Dear Editor,

    Cummings, et al, in their June, 2006 paper, "Changes in traffic crash mortality rates attributed to use of alcohol, or lack of a seat belt, air bag, motorcycle helmet, or bicycle helmet, United States, 1982-2001" [1] apparently assume that the data on bicycle helmet use among fatally injured bicyclists contained within the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) database is at least as valid as that...

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