eLetters

81 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Policy must be evidence-based to succeed
    Malcolm J Wardlaw

    Dear Editor

    “Policy must be evidence-based to succeed.”

    It is reported [1] that as the rate of helmet use by English cyclists increased by six percentage points from 16% to 22%, the proportion of hospital cases with serious head injuries declined slightly more for cyclists than pedestrians. This is advanced as evidence that cycle helmets prevent 60% of serious head injuries.

    The effectiveness of c...

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  • Impact of injuries attributed to lack of sequential triggers on nail guns on madatory legislation
    Neal Freedman

    Dear Editor

    The following excerpts are taken verbatim from "Making Nail Guns Safer"(Column 239, June 30, 2003) by Mary E. Alexander. Mary E. Alexander, president of the Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA), is a founding partner in the San Francisco law firm of Mary Alexander and Associates, P.C.

    “The International Staple, Nail and Tool Association (ISANTA, the trade group that represents too...

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  • Seatbelt immobilisers
    Tim J Halsey

    Dear Editor

    3500 people die every year in the UK from Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs), 40,000 are seriously injured with over 300,000 further casualties. The financial cost to the NHS is estimated at £3 billion a year.[1]

    Compulsory seat belt wearing is one of the most effective methods of reducing fatal and non-fatal injuries in motor vehicle crashes.[2] Averaged over all crashes, seat belts reduce driver fa...

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  • Humps and cardiac arrest survival
    Raymond E. Brindle

    Dear Editor

    London Ambulance Service's own data suggests that, of 8000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests a year, 400 survive, with a response time of 8 minutes. The Scottish data reported by Pell et al.[1] suggest that a 3-minute reduction in response could improve that figure by about 25% (say, 8% per minute) but that increasing the response time to 15 minutes lowers the survival rate by only 25% (less than 4%...

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  • Re: Response to Busted flush
    Barry Pless

    eLetter from Editor
    In a spirit of open access I agreed to post the letter from Richard Burton but cannot permit it to pass without comment. Though it is somewhat difficult to do so because it is not always clear what Burton means, it is evident that either he does not understand what peer review means or has distorted the meaning.

    The reference to the Thompson and Rivara articles on helmet...

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  • Narrow views
    Barry Pless

    eLetter from Editor
    Bravo Alison on an extremely informative Book Review. It is further evidence of how far we have to go. Not only is there little mention of injury prevention as an example of the translation process... getting research findings into practice... but the authors also take an unwarranted position on legislation.. one that is not backed up by solid evidence. Their neglect of injury p...

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  • Busted flush
    Richard W Burton

    Dear Editor

    Thompsons and Rivara have published a number of articles in scientific journals. Most, if not all of these purport to show that cycle helmets are extraordinarily effective, against whole-population robust research. Many of them have been peer reviewed and found to be worthless e.g. their claim that cycle helmets prevented 85% of injuries and deaths, based on the fact that helmeted cyclists riding in pa...

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  • Study underestimates fact that crash and violation rates do not decrease in intervention group
    Douglas M London

    Dear Editor

    While the authors findings [1] illustrate that the Checkpoints Program is an effective tool in the parental restriction of teen driving, one must not overlook the fact that that there is no difference between the safety of novice drivers in the intervention group versus the control group. As the authors report, the levels of tickets and crashes are the same at months four and nine for both groups, raisin...

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  • Blurring Work Safety: A blessing or a curse? Thoughts on the blurring in NZ
    John Wren

    Dear Editor

    Gordon Smith’s editorial is timely, blurring of the boundaries between work place safety and the home is a reality in New Zealand.[1] A good example of this blurring can be found in a story titled “Mill shows it's safer than houses” in today’s edition of the New Zealand Herald :htt...

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  • Minority Reports
    Thein T Ohn

    Dear Editor

    Firework related injuries are common in children as well as young adults and could lead to long term disability.[1] Past reports described the most of the firework related thermal injuries were caused by firecrackers, sparklers and bangers. In addition these injuries are frequent during the new year and Christmas periods.[2] From Asia, a report stressed the potential of health education for the per...

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