eLetters

60 e-Letters

published between 2006 and 2009

  • MOTOCYCLE INJURIES AND HELMET USE IN NIGERIA
    Ime A John

    Dear Editor,

    It was not only fashionable but life saving for motorcyclists to use helmet while transiting in the 70s and 80s.Limited best practise based on knowledge couple with deteriorating standard of education and not only cost and warm climate may be the attributing factors resulting in the decline of helmet use in the present Nigeria.

    Also, cultural or perhaps religious reasons may explain the use...

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  • Is peer review in Injury Prevention better than random?
    Eric M. Ossiander

    Dear Editor,

    In an editorial [1], you presented data from a study of peer reviews of 20 randomly selected papers submitted to Injury Prevention. Each paper was independently reviewed by three reviewers, who score...

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  • Why stop at cyclists?
    Peter W Ward

    Dear Editor,

    The research letter from Vardy et al (1) seems to suggest that getting head teachers to lecture primary school kids about helmet-wearing made no difference to helmet-wearing rates among those attending hospital with cycling injuries. Neither did it alter the proportion of head injuries. But it was associated with a reduction in the total number of children attending hospital with cycling injuries...

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  • Faulty FARS bicycle helmet use data & implications for effectiveness
    David A. Lombardi, PhD

    Dear Editor and Authors,

    Dr. Geary makes a very important point regarding the validity of the data on the use or non-use of bicycle helmet use abstracted from FARS and recently published by Cummings, et al, in their June, 2006 paper. This issue is one of the most important limitations and challenges in the use of narrative analysis. We previously struggled with a similar issue in a study published in Injury P...

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  • Faulty FARS bicycle helmet use data & implications for effectiveness
    Riley R Geary

    Dear Editor,

    Cummings, et al, in their June, 2006 paper, "Changes in traffic crash mortality rates attributed to use of alcohol, or lack of a seat belt, air bag, motorcycle helmet, or bicycle helmet, United States, 1982-2001" [1] apparently assume that the data on bicycle helmet use among fatally injured bicyclists contained within the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) database is at least as valid as that...

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  • "Manual stack reviews. Brief history of injury and accident prevention publications "
    Les Fisher

    Dear Editor,

    Thank you for an innovative and practical editorial illustrating applications of the Web of Science for historical research on peer reviewed journal archives (1).

    Several years ago, I went to a medical library and manually reviewed all the annual indices between 1900 and 1975 of the American Journal of Public Health and of Public Health Reports for citations on home or child a...

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  • An old game
    JM DeVink

    Dear Editor,

    Like Ann L., I tried this 'game' when I was in grade school. This would have been 1990 in New Brunswick. It was something I learned from other schoolmates, and was relatively common among students of grades 5-6. We used a self strangulation technique where we would grab our neck with palms on either side of the trachea restricting blood flow causing us to pass out. We were eventually caught doing this...

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  • I'm 16 years old and have experienced the Choking Game
    Lyndsey M.G Holmes

    Hi my name is Lyndsey, I am 16 and my Mother Cindy recently told me about the choking game. I have had some experiences with this game. The only difference is that my friends and I would call it Black Out.

    How we would start out playing this game is, we would sit on the ground with our knees up and leaning over with our elbows on our knees. We would then take really hard breaths in and out until we couldn't h...

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  • The Passing Out Game
    Cindy G. Holmes

    Dear Editor,

    I watched the Fifth Estate program which aired March 15, 2006 and I was saddened to hear of the parents who lost their children but also saddened on how naive our system is to overlook what the truth really is. I felt compelled to call the coroner myself and tell him about my story growing up when we called the Choking Game, the Passing Out Game. My friends and I didn't use objects around our necks...

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  • ER data just as bad
    John Langley

    Shepherd and Sivarajasingam provide a range of compelling reasons why police records of violence should not be used to measure underlying trends in violence. Essentially there are major threats to validity. They do not discuss potential means to reduce this threat. They also identify significant similar threats to validity of emergency department data but do not say how these should be addressed. They then conclude: "G...

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