eLetters

81 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Another serious error in Cook & Sheikh's analysis
    John Franklin

    Dear Editor

    There is another serious problem with Cook and Sheikh's paper.[1] The authors cite a TRL report [2] stating that, on major roads, helmet wearing (%HW) increased from 16.0%, in 1994, to 17.6% in 1996 then 21.8% in 1999. The TRL report continues: "this was due to an increase among adult cyclists wearing helmets: there was no change amongst child cyclists."[2]

    In fact, Table 3 shows %HW o...

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  • Every driver needs metabolic testing and the information needs to be stored in a "black box"
    Richard G Fiddian-Green
    Dear Editor

    I read the article by Shults et al with interest.[1] State driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) countermeasures [2] is a rational measure but one that has serious limitations including the confounding influence of recreational drugs, carbon monoxide, other environmental toxins, medications and cerebrovascular diseases. The immediate opportunity exists for implementing a far more rational an...

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  • Authors' reply
    Adrian D Cook
    Dear Editor

    We are grateful to Annan for spotting the arithmetic error in the discussion section of our paper of trends in cyclist head injuries.[1] It would be a mistake, however, to allow a minor mistake in the discussion to divert attention from the main finding of the paper, which was that cyclist head injuries fell during a time of increased helmet wearing. Population level time trend studies are limited in the am...

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  • Cycle helmets: time for a reality check
    Guy Chapman

    Dear Editor

    To focus on injury mitigation in cyclists to the exclusion of addressing the causes of crashes, as is the trend in public debate at present,[1] risks fundamental errors - not least the post hoc fallacy of assuming that cycling head injuries are the result of failure to wear helmets, rather than of the types of crashes cyclists experience.

    As a result of this obsession we have arrived at the ab...

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  • Re: Unwarranted Assumptions about FARS data
    R A Whitfield

    Dear Editor

    We thank Dr Carra for his comments[1] and we appreciate his attention to our work.[2]

    Our paper was directed to a method for ranking potential safety problems that merit additional statistical and engineering review. We envisioned a surveillance process to develop a rank ordered problem list. A follow-up review process should start at the top of the problem list and work down through it,...

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  • Response from the Authors
    William V. Fabricius

    Dear Editor

    Our critics argue two points. First, they argue that newspapers are an inappropriate source of data on defensive gun use (DGU) because editors routinely and deliberately suppress stories of legitimate DGU that involve killing or wounding or firing at an adversary. (Some of these writers also argue that brandishing a gun in self-defense is even less likely to be reported in the newspaper because these...

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  • IP is lacking objectivity
    Avery Burdett

    Dear Editor

    IP is gaining a reputation in the cycling community as a journal lacking in objectivity when it concerns the effectiveness of bicycle helmets. Its past zealous defence of flaws found in helmet research that IP has published gives cause for concern.

    Its latest silence over the identification of a serious calculation error (Annan [1]) raises serious ethical questions as well as doubts about...

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  • Unwarranted Assumptions about FARS data
    Joseph Carra

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the article by Whitfield and Whitefield that recently appeared in Injury Prevention.[1] I share their concern in identifying traffic safety issues as early as possible. Unfortunately the authors have made some unwarranted assumptions about the FARS data system and analysis based on it.

    We do not find any problem with the statistics on tire problems or fires that were repo...

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  • The value of news reports for injury surveillance
    Anara S Guard

    Dear Editor

    I find it no coincidence that the letters so far [1-4] are taking issue with the methodology of Denton and Fabricius,[5] rather than the subject, even though several of the letter-writers are on record elsewhere as opposing gun control in many forms. (For example, see optometrist Gallant’s comments on gun safety at:
    http://i2i.org...

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  • Reality Check for the Publisher
    Michael A. Feiertag, M.D.

    Dear Editor

    It is understandable that a high school student can survey local newspaper articles and some associated police reports and get school credit for a project that has no scientific validity or value. It is disappointing but not surprising that the student's local newspaper published a story about the invalid project. It is shocking that a purportedly scholarly journal (Injury Prevention) accepted the no...

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