eLetters

169 e-Letters

  • High-conspicuity aids and motorists' perception of cyclists' motion and distance
    Tony H. Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor

    As Thornley et al [1] indicate, the use of high-conspicuity aids by cyclists must be beneficial: motorists can only avoid collision with the cyclist if they can detect the cyclist.

    Unfortunately, high-conspicuity aids are not likely to affect the visibility of the roadway environment around the cyclist, so motorists' perceptions of the cyclist's motion and distance will remain poor in condi...

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  • Worldwide helmet concerns
    Colin F Clarke

    Dear Editor

    The article by Macpherson et al[1] relies on surveys from 111 sites around East York (Toronto) and some questions remain about these surveys. Data from two reports provides confusing indications on the level of cycling. In 2001[2] figures were published for the hourly rate for several years and by comparison in 2003[3] counts for 8-years were provided based on 1 hour observation at each site. An hourly rate...

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  • Unmentionables
    tOM Trottier tOM Trottier

    Dear Editor

    The paper asserts that the dimunition of risk is due to the increase in cyclists. Could it be the other way round, that more cycle as it becomes less risky (due to unknown factors...)?

    The risk reduction is purely for cyclists/walkers. Would the population as a whole experience less risk if they all drove? In extremis, if all cycled, they would have no cars to collide with, while if none cycle...

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  • Timely reporting, concurrent comparisons and common sense
    Dr Dorothy L Robinson

    Dear Editor

    Changes in %HI unrelated to %HW
    Common sense tells us that if the reduction in head injuries were due to helmet laws, percent head injury (%HI) should decline in response to the increase in percent helmet wearing (%HW).

    Fig 1 shows this was not the case either in Ontario or British Columbia (BC), two provinces c...

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  • More on Robertson's paper
    Tony H. Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor

    I offer brief rejoinders to Robertson's critique of my comments:

    (a) Robertson may indeed have all the data available for the specified vehicles in his statistical analysis. Nonetheless, the theoretical underpinnings in any such statistical analysis assume an infinite population from which the real-world data are drawn.

    (b) I am not an adherent of the risk compensation hypothesis, wh...

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  • Author's response
    Leon S. Robertson

    Dear Editor

    Point A. The vehicles I studied are not a random sample but all of the specified vehicles in use (except pickups) during the period studied. Therefore, random sampling error does not apply. The paper clearly states, “The mix of vehicles in other countries and the ratios of pedestrians and bicyclists to motor vehicles would undoubtedly alter the percentages but it is unlikely that vehicles characteristic...

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  • Vehicle factors: engineering improvement does not necessarily deliver
    Tony H. Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor

    Robertson [1] has carried out correlational and regressional analyses of data concerning a number of vehicle factors and death rates of road users in the United States. Given the sometimes contentious issues that arise from such analyses, it behoves one to be cautious in what one concludes from this exercise. I list below three issues that are pertinent:

    (a) The degree of precision stated for...

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  • Scapegoating pedestrians: the limits of engineering solutions and pedestrian behaviour-change
    Tony H Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor

    Poudel-Tandukar et al report questionnaire data from a respondent sample of adolescent pedestrians in Nepal. Coincidentally, Perel et al [1] have outlined issues relating to road safety in low- and middle-income countries in the same issue of Injury Prevention.

    Commenting in an electronic letter regarding the latter, I asserted that a pervasive and unhelpful attitude often persists among moto...

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  • An endemic issue in all countries, no matter what their income
    Tony H Reinhardt-Rutland

    Dear Editor

    Perel et al (2007) outline some issues relating to research and its application - up to now largely restricted to high-income countries - which might inform and moderate the heavy casualty rates among vulnerable road users that too often follow motorisation in developing economies.

    One possible issue - both within the driving community and those professions charged with reducing casualty rate...

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  • Yes, this is an old game
    Stacey Robins

    Dear Editor

    In 1977 in London, Ontario, when we were only 12 years old, my 'girlfriends' and I used to play a similar game as the 'choking game' in the school bathroom. We would each take turns helping each other 'faint'. It started with deep breathing until we were dizzy, then with arms around your abdomen from the rear; someone would squeeze you until the next recollection was waking up with a tingling sensatio...

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