eLetters

81 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • No mass shootings in Australia since gun law reform
    Simon Chapman

    Dear Editor

    The 1996 national gun law reforms in Australia saw 660 959 semi-automatic and pump action shotguns removed from the Australian community. The impressive fall in the Victorian and Australian gun death rate and the falls in reported gun ownership in Melbourne homes reported by Ozanne-Smith et al plainly have much to do with this.[1] However the impact of the gun law reforms on mass killings is even mo...

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  • Re: “Firearm related deaths: the impact of regulatory reform”
    James B. Lawson

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest this paper by Ozanne-Smith and co-workers.[1] I congratulate the authors on their meticulous confirmation of the intuitive expectation that fewer firearms in the community correlates with a reduction in firearms deaths and injuries. Unfortunately, the authors confine themselves to the limited objective of studying firearm deaths in isolation. They do not ask whether the reduction...

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  • Meeting sports safety research challenges
    David L Nordstrom

    Dear Editor

    I am grateful to Caroline Finch for responding[1] to my letter suggesting research on soccer headgear.[2] Because there has been little research on risk factors for sports injury,[3] Finch is correct that headgear use in soccer is only one opportunity for sport safety research. However, certain factors make soccer headgear an especially attractive topic. The population at risk of soccer inj...

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  • Author's response inadaquate
    Peter W. Whelan

    Dear Editor

    In responding to my critique of the report,[1] Joan Ozanne-Smith failed to address my specific comments.[2] I therefore call upon her and her colleagues to explain more about their methodology: a) Why were the Victorian results not compared with those of Western Australia? Western Australia had draconian, restrictive firearms laws dating back many years, prior to the Vicorian laws, but they still have...

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  • Regulatory reform: no real effect on public health and safety
    Jeanine Baker

    Dear Editor

    We note with interest and concern the exchange between the Monash Research Group and Mr Whelan,[1] regarding serious flaws in the Monash study.[2]

    Upon close scrutiny, the claim that Victoria’s 1988 firearm legislation led to significant declines relative to the rest of Australia is unsupported by the actual data. Rather, we see that firearms suicides and assaults/homicides have been decl...

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  • Authors'Reply
    Joan Ozanne-Smith

    Dear Editor

    I am writing in response to a letter from P Whelan of the organization Coalition of Law Abiding Sporting Shooters Inc.[1]

    The authors of this recently published article would like to rebut attacks on the scientific facts and study design related to our research. The authors were careful to state that the dramatic reductions in firearm related fatalities in Victoria and Australia occurred in the cont...

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  • Monash Uni Report "junk science"
    Peter W Whelan
    Dear Editor

    The article by Ozanne-Smith et al surely indicates the low standard of Scientific Study being carried out by Monash University Accident Research Centre.[1] In claiming that the drop in firearm related deaths, from 1979-2000, was because of "strong regulatory refom", is to ignore all the other important factors which may have occurred during that period. To claim that Gun Laws were the single reason for...

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  • Sports safety research is not without its challenges
    Caroline F Finch

    Dear Editor

    Whilst I agree with Nordstrom[1] about the clear research opportunities in relation to headgear effectiveness for soccer players, I would like to make a few comments.

    Firstly, the issues raised are not just restricted to headgear use in soccer – they apply equally well to many other sports, particularly other football codes – and nor do they only apply to headgear use. Much of sports safet...

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  • Authors' second reply
    Adrian D Cook

    Dear Editor

    Franklin and Robinson are correct to question the complexity of the evidence on helmet wearing among children.[1] As a brief report our paper was unable to explore this in detail but we are grateful for the opportunity to do so here. The helmet wearing surveys suggested that helmet wearing fell among children between 1994 and 1996.[2] Analysing accident data for the years 1995/96 alone shows a corresp...

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  • Re: Authors' reply
    Tony Raven

    Dear Editor

    Cook and Sheikh have accepted the fundamental error in their paper pointed out by Annan.[1-3]

    When the arithmetic error is corrected there are only two conclusions that can be reached. One, pointed out by Annan,[2] is that for every helmet worn, two people are saved. This is clearly untenable and so the only other conclusion, also pointed out by Annan,[2] is that there are other factors invo...

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