eLetters

167 e-Letters

  • Narrow views
    Barry Pless

    eLetter from Editor
    Bravo Alison on an extremely informative Book Review. It is further evidence of how far we have to go. Not only is there little mention of injury prevention as an example of the translation process... getting research findings into practice... but the authors also take an unwarranted position on legislation.. one that is not backed up by solid evidence. Their neglect of injury p...

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  • Busted flush
    Richard W Burton

    Dear Editor

    Thompsons and Rivara have published a number of articles in scientific journals. Most, if not all of these purport to show that cycle helmets are extraordinarily effective, against whole-population robust research. Many of them have been peer reviewed and found to be worthless e.g. their claim that cycle helmets prevented 85% of injuries and deaths, based on the fact that helmeted cyclists riding in pa...

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  • Study underestimates fact that crash and violation rates do not decrease in intervention group
    Douglas M London

    Dear Editor

    While the authors findings [1] illustrate that the Checkpoints Program is an effective tool in the parental restriction of teen driving, one must not overlook the fact that that there is no difference between the safety of novice drivers in the intervention group versus the control group. As the authors report, the levels of tickets and crashes are the same at months four and nine for both groups, raisin...

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  • Blurring Work Safety: A blessing or a curse? Thoughts on the blurring in NZ
    John Wren

    Dear Editor

    Gordon Smith’s editorial is timely, blurring of the boundaries between work place safety and the home is a reality in New Zealand.[1] A good example of this blurring can be found in a story titled “Mill shows it's safer than houses” in today’s edition of the New Zealand Herald :htt...

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  • Minority Reports
    Thein T Ohn

    Dear Editor

    Firework related injuries are common in children as well as young adults and could lead to long term disability.[1] Past reports described the most of the firework related thermal injuries were caused by firecrackers, sparklers and bangers. In addition these injuries are frequent during the new year and Christmas periods.[2] From Asia, a report stressed the potential of health education for the per...

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  • Neighbourhood influences on child injuries
    Richard Reading

    Dear Editor

    We were interested to read the careful and detailed analysis of injury mortality data by Borrell et al.[1] We have also examined individual and neighbourhood effects on injury incidence in younger age groups and would like to draw these results to readers’ attention, as they extend and support the findings by Borrell et al. and were not referenced in their paper. In a study in Norwich, UK...

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  • Authors' response
    Catherine W. Barber

    Dear Editor

    Kleck states that the misclassification of some unintentional shootings as homicides is likely to be counterbalanced by the misclassification of some suicides as unintentional, citing a study of unintentional gun deaths in North Carolina in the 1970s as evidence.[1] However, the investigators in that study reviewed only self-inflicted shootings that were noted as "accidents" or "undetermined" for ma...

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  • Cigarettes more resistant to fire
    Carlean Ponder

    Dear Editor

    Thank you for your fine article on how child-resistant safety features on cigarette lighters have saved lives and reduced injuries of children. While I was Chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), I supported this effort as well as other actions to reduce fires caused by cigarettes.

    Research conducted by CPSC and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST...

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  • Doubts about undercounts of gun accident deaths
    Gary D. Kleck

    Dear Editor

    Barber et al.[1] note that some fatal gun accidents (FGAs) may be missclassified as homicides, and conclude that the nation "may be undercounting the burden of unintentional firearm deaths". They report 168 gun deaths labelled negligent (and thus accidental) manslaughters by police, and estimate that 75 % were misclassified as intentional homicides on death certificates, implying an undercount of...

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  • Re: Trend not seen in England
    Elisa R. Braver

    Dear Editor

    I see Mr Wilson used E-codes 810-819, which includes motor vehicle occupants, motorcyclists, pedestrians, and bicyclists. Our study included only drivers (4th digit of E-code = .0). I wonder if he would get the same results if he looked at 810-819 using only 4th digits of .0. One other potential explanation for the differences between the two countries is that we looked at driver involvements in crashe...

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