eLetters

95 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Some important omissions
    Peter W Ward

    Dear Editor

    Ivers makes some important omissions in her Cochrane Corner article [1] where she reports the recent Cochrane review of bicycle helmet legislation. The author’s main conclusion was that the evidence ‘suggests a protective effect of bicycle helmet legislation against head injury amongst cyclists.’ Ivers might also have mentioned the authors qualifying comments that the evidence is ‘limited in qual...

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  • Gun Lock Safety Issue
    Ronald R. Flinders

    Dear Editor

    I would challenge anyone using their bare hands to move or remove the trigger lock on my gun once properly installed and locked in place. That is, short of cutting it off with a hacksaw or using a hammer and chisel. Lumping all trigger locks in to one category and then making the statement that trigger locks are not a safe storage method is absolutely asinine. When it comes to the quality of trigger l...

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  • Re: An old game
    Sandy Clements

    Dear Editor

    I don't remember a time this game did not exist. I recall kids playing it in the early 1950's in Calgary, AB. Nor did it ever go away. It didn't have any hip street name back then nor was it called a game. It was just "Hey, let's do the thing(s) that made you pass out." It was done for the cool feeling we would now call a rush. I wouldn't do it with anyone because I did not trust anyone. When I got into...

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  • pH of exhaled breath condensate: a better metabolic marker?
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor

    The finding of an abnormally low pH in the exhaled breath condensates from patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis [1] raises the possibility that this pH might be a better metabolic marker to use especially if each driver were to establish his/her own control values. If exhaled breath were used alcohol and even other chemical levels could also be measured, recorded and stored in a black box. What is...

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  • Criticism and Comments on Alpers/Chapman paper
    Peter W. Whelan

    Dear Editor

    It is not my plan to revisit the detailed AIC/ABS data and statistical analysis covered by the Alpers/Chapman report and other specialists (McPhedran/Baker). This response will offer comments from the aspects of clear thinking and logical deduction.

    Firstly, since there was never any Judicial Inquiry, nor Coronial Inquest into the Port Arthur Massacre, there was never the opportunity for any...

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  • Re: Author's reply to Dr Lawson
    Dr. James B Lawson

    Dear Editor

    Re: Profs. Chapman and Alpers reply to Dr Lawson. E-letter 9 Jan 2007.

    I thank Professors Chapman and Alpers for their interest in my letter[1] in response to their paper[2].

    It seems that all parties[3,4,5] agree on the facts, that there was a steady decline in gun murder and suicide before the Australian National Firearms Agreement of 1996 and that this trend continued at a slight...

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  • More of the same from Alpers and Chapman
    Ross A Wilmoth

    Dear Editor

    I would not have expected any different from concerted 'public health advocates' and long time anti-gun campaigners Philip Alpers and Simon Chapman than a vindication of the John Howard gun bans.

    Could it be that they have discovered the one instance in the world where gun bans can be shown to have saved lives? Could Australia be the exception to the rule that gun laws are ineffective the worl...

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  • Good data and constructive debate can help resolve controversial issues
    Dr Dorothy L Robinson

    Barry Pless claimed that critics of helmet laws rely on fatality data. Yet my review considered all injuries serious enough to require hospital admission in all jurisdictions where helmet wearing increased substantially (more than 40 percentage points). There were no obvious responses in percent head injury.[1]

    In contrast, the large, ob...

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  • Protective balancing - an option for fall prevention among older subjects
    Karsten Knobloch

    Dear editor,

    We read with great interest the cost analysis of fatal and non-fatal falls among older adults aged >or=65 years. The authors point out that fall related injuries among older adults are associated with substantial economic costs with fractures accounting for 35% of non-fatal injuries but 61% for total costs. The authors concluded that effective intervention strategies are mandatory to implement in...

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  • Reply to Mr. Wardlaw's letter "Timely reporting of research is necessary"
    Alison K. Macpherson

    Dear Editor

    In his letter "Timely reporting of research is necessary", Mr Wardlaw suggests that lack of enforcement of bicycle helmet legislation in Ontario is an underreported aspect of bicycle helmet research.

    Although the issue of enforcement of legislation has been raised as a potentially important aspect of bicycle helmet laws, to our knowledge, no one has studied the nature of enforcement of helmet leg...

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