eLetters

167 e-Letters

published between 2014 and 2017

  • False assumption that all new cyclists previously drove
    Mark Kaepplein

    Your air pollution reduction benefit is based on a very poor assumption of all new cyclists were former drivers (per Rabl and De Nazelle) could be no more wrong than in NYC with the biggest public transit system in the US, lowest per capita car ownership and miles driven of any major city, and where over 56% of workers use public transit, and over 10% walk. Even the estimated 30% who drive or cab to work are unlikely to...

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  • The challenge of spinal cord injury in Post-earthquake Nepal
    Kumar Paudel

    On 25 April 2015 Nepal witnessed a huge earthquake of 7.8 magnitude claiming over 8000 lives and injuring more than 23,000[1].Those injured incurred either crush injuries, fractures or head and spinal cord trauma. WHO estimates,over 400 people have sustained spinal cord injuries owing to earthquake.[2]. They have become either paralyzed or developed weakness of limbs (paraparesis) extending from neck downward (quadriparesi...

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  • Recompression in water with air supply at shallow depth cannot be superior to breathing pure oxygen on surface
    yavuz aslan

    Sir,

    We read with interest the article named 'Prevention and treatment of decompression sickness using training and in-water recompression among fisherman divers in Vietnam' that was published in Injury Prevention 2016 February issue. We want to share our opinion about some parts of the article, especially in three subjects.

    It was mentioned that, the aim of the study was to investigate the impact o...

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  • Author's response inadaquate
    Peter W. Whelan

    Dear Editor

    In responding to my critique of the report,[1] Joan Ozanne-Smith failed to address my specific comments.[2] I therefore call upon her and her colleagues to explain more about their methodology: a) Why were the Victorian results not compared with those of Western Australia? Western Australia had draconian, restrictive firearms laws dating back many years, prior to the Vicorian laws, but they still have...

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  • Re: “Firearm related deaths: the impact of regulatory reform”
    James B. Lawson

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest this paper by Ozanne-Smith and co-workers.[1] I congratulate the authors on their meticulous confirmation of the intuitive expectation that fewer firearms in the community correlates with a reduction in firearms deaths and injuries. Unfortunately, the authors confine themselves to the limited objective of studying firearm deaths in isolation. They do not ask whether the reduction...

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  • No mass shootings in Australia since gun law reform
    Simon Chapman

    Dear Editor

    The 1996 national gun law reforms in Australia saw 660 959 semi-automatic and pump action shotguns removed from the Australian community. The impressive fall in the Victorian and Australian gun death rate and the falls in reported gun ownership in Melbourne homes reported by Ozanne-Smith et al plainly have much to do with this.[1] However the impact of the gun law reforms on mass killings is even mo...

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  • Response to Simon Chapman
    Peter W. Whelan

    Dear Editor

    I read the response from Chapman with interest.[1] In referring to the number of guns handed in during the 1996/97 buy back, Chapman fails to disclose that those firearms, legally owned by farmers and sporting shooters, had never been a problem in society. I refer to the submission by Australian Institute of Criminology to the publication "Evaluating Gun Policy: Effects on Crime and Violence" published...

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  • Prices and affordability of child restraint seats in Japan
    Ediriweera B.R., Desapriya

    Dear Editor

    We read the article by Hendrie et al with interest.[1] Compared to the salaries of their North American and European counterparts, the average Japanese family income is higher. The majority of parents tend to believe that the cost of child restraint seats (CRS) is comparatively higher than other countries. CRS in Japan are much more expensive - around US$ 250-400. Government subsidiary would be nece...

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  • Re: No mass shootings in Australia since gun law reform.
    Dr. James B. Lawson

    Dear Editor

    I note with interest Chapman's contribution to the discussion[1] on the paper by Ozanne-Smith et al. on firearm law reform in Australia.[2] Chapman's claims are not incorrect, as far as they go. However, like Ozanne-Smith et al, it is what Chapman has left out that may confuse readers.

    There have been several mass murders (defined as four or more deaths in one incident) in A...

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  • Why not freedom to own rocket launchers?
    Simon Chapman

    Dear Editor

    Despite James Lawson’s best efforts to suggest otherwise [1], ordinary people – and thankfully nearly all politicians on all sides of Australian politics -- understand that 10 mass shootings involving 66 deaths in 10 years, followed by 103 months with no such incidents is a positive development. Opinion polls before and after the 1996 Port Arthur massacre repeatedly showed overwhelming proportions of A...

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