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Applying a systems thinking lens to injury causation in the outdoors: Evidence collected during 3 years of the Understanding and Preventing Led Outdoor Accidents Data System
  1. Scott McLean1,
  2. Caroline F Finch2,
  3. Natassia Goode1,3,
  4. Amanda Clacy4,
  5. Lauren J Coventon1,
  6. Paul M Salmon1
  1. 1Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems, University of the Sunshine Coast Sippy Downs Campus, Sippy Downs, Queensland, Australia
  2. 2School of Health and Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
  3. 3WorkSafe Victoria, Geelong, Victoria, Australia
  4. 4Sunshine Coast Mind and Neuroscience, Thompson Institute, University of the Sunshine Coast, Birtinya, Queensland, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Scott McLean, Centre for Human Factors and Sociotechnical Systems, University of the Sunshine Coast Sippy Downs Campus, Sippy Downs, QLD 4556, Australia; smclean{at}usc.edu.au

Abstract

Introduction This article presents a detailed systems analysis of injury incidents from 35 Australian led outdoor activity organisations between 2014 to 2017.

Method Injury incident reports were collected using a specific led outdoor activity incident reporting system known as UPLOADS (Understanding and Preventing Led Outdoor Accidents Data System).

Results In total, 1367 people sustained injuries from across 20 different activities, with an injury rate of 1.9 injured people per 1000 participants over the three-year period. A total of 2234 contributory factors from multiple levels of the led outdoor activity system were identified from the incident reports, and 361 relationships were identified between contributory factors.

Discussion This systems analysis of injury incidents demonstrates that it is not only factors within the immediate context of the incident (Participants, Environment, Equipment) but factors from across multiple systemic levels that contributes to injury incidents (Schools, Parents, Activity centre management). Prevention efforts should focus on addressing the whole network of contributing factors and not only the prominent factors at the lower system levels within the immediate context of the injury incident occurrences.

  • incident reporting
  • AcciMap
  • contributory factors
  • led outdoor activity
  • systems thinking
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Footnotes

  • Twitter @DrScottMclean, @CarolineFinch

  • Contributors All authors contributed to the study design, data collection, data analysis, writing and revisions of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was funded by Australian Research Council.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available on reasonable request.

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