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Overloading among crash-involved vehicles in China: identification of factors associated with overloading and crash severity
  1. Guangnan Zhang1,
  2. Yanyan Li2,
  3. Mark J King3,
  4. Qiaoting Zhong1
  1. 1Center for Studies of Hong Kong, Macao and Pearl River Delta, Institute of Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao Development Studies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China
  2. 2Department of Civil Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
  3. 3Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q), Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Qiaoting Zhong, Center for Studies of Hong Kong, Macao and Pearl River Delta, Institute of Guangdong, Hong Kong and Macao Development Studies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China ; i.qt.zhong{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objective Motor vehicle overloading is correlated with the possibility of road crash occurrence and severity. Although overloading of motor vehicles is pervasive in developing nations, few empirical analyses have been performed on factors that might influence the occurrence of overloading. This study aims to address this shortcoming by seeking evidence from several years of crash data from Guangdong province, China.

Methods Data on overloading and other factors are extracted for crash-involved vehicles from traffic crash records for 2006–2010 provided by the Traffic Management Bureau in Guangdong province. Logistic regression is applied to identify risk factors for overloading in crash-involved vehicles and within these crashes to identify factors contributing to greater crash severity. Driver, vehicle, road and environmental characteristics and violation types are considered in the regression models. In addition to the basic logistic models, association analysis is employed to identify the potential interactions among different risk factors during fitting the logistic models of overloading and severity.

Results Crash-involved vehicles driven by males from rural households and in an unsafe condition are more likely to be overloaded and to be involved in higher severity overloaded vehicle crashes. If overloaded vehicles speed, the risk of severe traffic crash casualties increases. Young drivers (aged under 25 years) in mountainous areas are more likely to be involved in higher severity overloaded vehicle crashes.

Conclusions This study identifies several factors associated with overloading in crash-involved vehicles and with higher severity overloading crashes and provides an important reference for future research on those specific risk factors.

  • vehicle overloading
  • risk factors
  • crash-involved
  • crash severity
  • road safety
  • association analysis

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GZ identified the research gap, acquired the data and critically reviewed the data quality and methodology. YL developed the methodology, performed the analysis and drafted the manuscript. QZ led the process of review and revision of the article. All authors contributed to interpretation of results and the manuscript’s revision and approval.

  • Funding This research was supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China grant 71573286. YL received financial support from China Scholarship Council (CSC) for financial support.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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