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Fatal occupational electrocutions in the United States
  1. A J Taylor1,
  2. G McGwin, Jr2,
  3. F Valent1,
  4. L W Rue III3
  1. 1Center for Injury Sciences, University of Alabama (UAB) at Birmingham and Department of Epidemiology and International Health, School of Public Health, UAB
  2. 2Center for Injury Sciences, UAB and Section of Trauma, Burns, and Surgical Critical Care, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, UAB
  3. 3Center for Injury Sciences, UAB and Section of Trauma, Burns, and Surgical Critical Care, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, UAB
  1. Correspondence to:
 Allison J Taylor, Center for Injury Sciences, 115 Kracke Building, 1922 7th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA;
 allison.taylor{at}ccc.uab.edu

Abstract

Introduction: The highest proportions of fatal occupational electrocutions have occurred among those employed in the electrical trades and in the construction and manufacturing industries.

Methods: Data from 1992 through 1999 were obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Results: Occupational electrocution deaths occurred almost entirely among males, with the highest rates among those aged 20–34 and among whites and American Indians. They were highest during the summer months, in the South, and in establishments employing 10 or fewer workers. The highest rates occurred in the construction, mining, and agriculture, forestry, and fishing industries and among trades associated with these industries.

Conclusions: Electrocution continues to be a significant cause of occupational death. Workers need to be provided with safety training and employers, particularly smaller employers, persuaded of the need for safety training.

  • electrocution
  • occupational injury
  • Census of Fatal Occupational Injury
  • CFOI, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
  • COCS, Census Occupation Classification System
  • NIOSH, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • NTOF, National Traumatic Occupational Fatalities (surveillance system)
  • OIICS, Occupational Injury and Illness Classification Structures
  • OSHA, Occupational Safety and Health Administration
  • electrocution
  • occupational injury
  • Census of Fatal Occupational Injury
  • CFOI, Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
  • COCS, Census Occupation Classification System
  • NIOSH, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  • NTOF, National Traumatic Occupational Fatalities (surveillance system)
  • OIICS, Occupational Injury and Illness Classification Structures
  • OSHA, Occupational Safety and Health Administration
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