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Prevalence and risk factors for road traffic injuries and mortalities in Ethiopia: systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. Zewditu Abdissa Denu1,
  2. Mensur Yassin Osman2,
  3. Telake Azale Bisetegn3,
  4. Gashaw Andargie Biks4,
  5. Kassahun Alemu Gelaye5
  1. 1 Department of Anaesthesia, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia
  2. 2 Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia
  3. 3 Department of Health Communication and Behavioral Science, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia
  4. 4 Department of Health Policy and Management, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia
  5. 5 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia
  1. Correspondence to Zewditu Abdissa Denu, Anaesthesia, University of Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Gondar, Amhara P.O.Box 196, Ethiopia; zewditudenuabdissa{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background Road traffic injuries, which are responsible for premature deaths and functional losses, are the leading causes of unintentional injuries in Ethiopia. As most studies on road traffic injuries, so far, have been either local or regional, it is believed that combining the regional or local data to get nationally representative information could help programme implementers in setting priorities.

Objective The aim of this review was to estimate the proportion of road traffic injuries, mortality and risk factors for the problem among all age groups in Ethiopia.

Data sources A systematic review of articles using MEDLINE/PubMed SCOPUS Web of Science and science direct was conducted. Additional studies were identified via manual search.

Study selection Only studies that reported road traffic injuries and/or mortalities for all age groups were included in this review.

Data synthesis All pooled analyses were based on random-effect models. Twenty-six studies for the prevalence of RTIs (n=37 424), 24 studies for road traffic injuries (RTI) mortality, (n=38 888), 9 studies for prevalence of fracture among RTIs (n=2817) and 5 studies for the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (n=1733) met our inclusion criteria. Driving in the dark increased severity of injury by 1.77, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.95). The certainty of the evidence was assessed using GRADEpro Guideline Development Tool.

Conclusion In this review, the burden of road traffic injuries and mortalities remains high in Ethiopia. Human factors are the most common causes of the problem in Ethiopia. The existing safety regulations should be re-evaluated and supported by continuous behavioural interventions.

PROSPERO registration number CRD42019124406.

  • metanalysis
  • systematic review
  • mortality
  • public health

Data availability statement

Data are available upon request.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon request.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors ZAD designed the study, data analysis, interpretation of results and write up of the manuscript. KAG involved in the design, did the article searching, critical appraisal, data extraction, analysed the data and critically reviewed the draft manuscript. GAB, TAB and MYO were involved in the design, analysis of the data, drafting of the manuscript and critically reviewed the article. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. All authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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