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Unintentional injury deaths among American Indian residents of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, 2006–2012
  1. Anne Kenney1,
  2. Wendy Shields2,
  3. Alexandra Hinton1,
  4. Francene Larzelere3,
  5. Novalene Goklish3,
  6. Kyle Gardner4,
  7. Shannon Frattaroli2,
  8. Allison Barlow5
  1. 1 International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  2. 2 Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  3. 3 International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Whiteriver, Arizona, USA
  4. 4 Arizona Department of Health Services, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
  5. 5 International Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Anne Kenney, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; akenney3{at}jhu.edu

Abstract

This study aims to describe the epidemiology of unintentional injury deaths among American Indian residents of the Fort Apache Indian Reservation between 2006 and 2012. Unintentional injury death data were obtained from the Arizona Department of Health Services and death rates were calculated per 100 000 people per year and age adjusted using data obtained from Indian Health Service and the age distribution of the 2010 US Census. Rate ratios were calculated using the comparison data obtained through CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. The overall unintentional injury mortality rate among American Indians residing on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation between 2006 and 2012 was 107.0 per 100 000. When stratified by age, White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT) mortality rates for all unintentional injuries exceed the US all races rate except for ages 10–14 for which there were no deaths due to unintentional injury during this period. The leading causes of unintentional injury deaths were MVCs and poisonings. Unintentional injuries are a significant public health problem in the American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Tribal-specific analyses are critical to inform targeted prevention and priority setting.

  • mortality
  • health disparities
  • descriptive epidemiology
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Footnotes

  • Contributors AK, WS and AH contributed to the conceptualisation of this manuscript and wrote the first draft. AH and KG were responsible for data analyses and data integrity. AK, WS, AB, SF, NG and FL contributed to the conceptualisation and implementation of the study, and development of study questions. NG and FL provided feedback on analyses and revised and expanded the manuscript with a focus on the introduction, discussion and conclusion. All authors made important intellectual contributions and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by a grant from the National Center for Injury Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (grant #1R49CE002466).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Approval for this study was received from the White Mountain Apache Tribe Health Board and Tribal Council, the Phoenix Area Indian Health Service Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health IRB.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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