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Conspicuity and bicycle crashes: preliminary findings of the Taupo Bicycle Study
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  • Published on:
    Side flag

    Dear Editor

    One strategy to increase the bubble around you is to put a side flag on your passing side. Drivers then give you more room. EG, see http://www.bikecommuters.com/2007/08/18/d-tour-bicycle-safety-flag-first- impression/

    Tom

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Cycling in New Zealand

    Dear Editor

    My wife and I spent a couple of months cycling in the South Island last year. Apart from some cycling-friendly towns (eg Nelson, Wanaka) it was in general a terrifying and oppressive experience. Even on relatively quiet roads, overtaking traffic would often scrape past us in spite of our obvious visibility and bulk (because of our loads) and relative instability. Following traffic unable to overtake w...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: High-conspicuity aids and motorists' perception of cyclists' motion and distance

    Dear Editor

    The original study considered fluorescent clothing which stands out with bright unusual colours. The background matters less, so long as it does not consist of other bright unusual colours. It would be interesting if the original data considered where the fluorescent cyclists had collisions. I expect that they were more at risk along commercial streets than residential ones because of the many commerc...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    High-conspicuity aids and motorists' perception of cyclists' motion and distance

    Dear Editor

    As Thornley et al [1] indicate, the use of high-conspicuity aids by cyclists must be beneficial: motorists can only avoid collision with the cyclist if they can detect the cyclist.

    Unfortunately, high-conspicuity aids are not likely to affect the visibility of the roadway environment around the cyclist, so motorists' perceptions of the cyclist's motion and distance will remain poor in condi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.