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Longer term effects of New York State’s law on drivers’ handheld cell phone use
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  • Published on:
    Re: Handheld vs Handsfree

    Dear Editor

    The study of the effects of using a mobile phone while driving may reveal interesting socioeconomic and traffic data, and may be perfectly worthwhile as a scientific pursuit.[1] Using this data as a basis for legislation, however, is a bad idea. Common sense tells us that doing anything while driving, be it talking on the phone, applying makeup, operating the radio, or carrying on a conversation wit...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply
    • Anne T McCartt, Highway Safety Research
    • Other Contributors:
      • Lori L. Geary

    Dear Editor

    Regarding the eLetter by McCartt and Geary.[1]

    Our study had the specific, stated objective of determining whether New York’s ban on drivers’ use of hand-held phones led to short-term and long-term changes in the use rates of hand-held phones while driving. Our intent was not to assess the relative safety effects of hands-free versus handheld devices. In the discussion, we note that any subs...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Handheld vs Handsfree

    Dear Editor

    McCartt and Geary in their recent article in IP [1] have glossed over the problem with banning hand held phones in that there is now a large body of evidence showing that there is no safety benefit to be gained from hands free devices ie they are both dangerous. The problem with outlawing handheld but allowing handsfree phones is the implicit message that handsfree is somehow safer. The problem was rec...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.