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A multilevel analysis of risk and protective factors for Canadian youth injured or killed by interpersonal violence
  1. Carolyn E Snider1,2,
  2. Marni Brownell2,
  3. Brenden Dufault3,
  4. Nicole Barrett4,
  5. Heather Prior2,
  6. Carla Cochrane5
  1. 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Children’s Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  2. 2Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Department of Community Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  3. 3Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, George and Fay Yee Center for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg, Canada
  4. 4Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  5. 5Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, Winnipeg, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Dr Carolyn E Snider, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Manitoba, 656A-715 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg MB R3M 1E1, Canada; csnider{at}chrim.ca

Abstract

Purpose The study’s purpose was to determine individual-level and neighbourhood-level risk and protective factors for severe intentional injury among youth.

Methods We conducted a multilevel case–control study using registry data to determine individual-level and neighbourhood-level social determinants associated with severe violent injury/homicide among youth from Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Results The study includes 13 206 youth, aged 12–24 years (1222 cases, 11 984 controls). Individual-level risk predictors of being a victim of violence were male sex (OR 5.72 (95% CI 4.77 to 6.86)) and First Nations (OR 2.76 (95% CI 2.32 to 3.29)). Education was inversely associated with victimisation for individuals under (OR 0.36 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.51)) and over (OR 0.58 (95% CI 0.49 to 0.69)) 18 years. Ever having been in protective care (OR 1.66 (95% CI 1.39 to 1.99)), receiving income assistance from the government (OR 1.26 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.51)) or ever having criminal charges (OR 4.76 (95% CI 4.08 to 5.56)) were also significant predictors of being a victim of violence. Neighbourhood-level risk factors for victimisation included low socioeconomic status (OR 1.14 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.25)) and high levels of assault (OR 1.07 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.10)).

Conclusions This study demonstrates a complex web of risk and protective factors among youth injured by violence. It underscores the ongoing, injurious effects of historical trauma experienced by many Canadian First Nations people. Strong victim–perpetrator overlap suggests that intersectoral policies are needed to address these issues. Our findings highlight the need to improve education and family supports.

  • Violence
  • Youth
  • Public Health

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CES conceived and designed the study and drafted the article. She contributed to interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article. MB contributed to design of the study, interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article. BD contributed to design of the study, wrote the statistical plan and was responsible for statistical analysis. He contributed to interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article. NB contributed to interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article. HP contributed to acquisition and cleaning of the data, interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article. CC contributed to design of the study, interpretation of the data, revisions and final approval of the article.

  • Disclaimer The results and conclusions are those of the authors and no official endorsement by the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Manitoba Health, Seniors & Active Living, or other data providers is intended or should be inferred.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval University of Manitoba Health Research Ethics Board.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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