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Sexual violence experienced by male and female Chinese college students in Guangzhou
  1. Chang Wang1,
  2. Xiaomei Dong2,3,
  3. Jingzhen Yang4,5,
  4. Marizen Ramirez5,6,
  5. Guibo Chi2,3,
  6. Corinne Peek-Asa5,6,
  7. Shengyong Wang2,3
  1. 1Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  2. 2Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Medical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  3. 3Department of Epidemiology, Medical College of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China
  4. 4Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA
  5. 5Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  6. 6Injury Prevention Research Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jingzhen Yang, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242, USA; jyang23{at}kent.edu
  2. Professor Shengyong Wang, Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Medical College of Jinan University, No.601 Huangpu road west, Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, 510632, China; shengyong_wang{at}126.com

Abstract

Objectives Sexual violence research in China is in its early stages. This study described the sexual violence experience of college students in Guangzhou, China, and examined the individual and family factors associated with increased sexual perpetration and victimisation.

Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2200 college students from three universities in Guangzhou, China, was conducted in 2010. Data on sexual perpetration and/or victimisation experienced during the past 12 months were collected. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the individual and family factors associated with odds of sexual assault perpetration, victimisation, or both.

Results Over a quarter (25.4%) of students experienced at least one form of sexual violence during the past 12 months, either as a perpetrator or as a victim, and nearly 10% of students experienced both perpetration and victimisation. The number of students who identified themselves as being solely a victim was almost three times lower than being a perpetrator only (n=87 vs n=246). Engaging in risky behaviours was associated with increased odds of being a perpetrator and being both a perpetrator and a victim. Prior mistreatment by teachers or bullying by others was linked to increased risk of both perpetration and victimisation. Male students who had indulgent parents (responsive but not demanding) were at increased risk of perpetration compared with those students with authoritative parents (responsive and demanding).

Conclusions The findings add to empirical data on sexual violence in college students and reinforce the urgent need for implementation of successful sexual violence prevention programmes in China.

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