rss
Inj Prev doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040622
  • Original article

An economic evaluation of anonymised information sharing in a partnership between health services, police and local government for preventing violence-related injury

  1. Thomas R Simon4
  1. 1Division of Analysis, Research and Practice Integration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  2. 2Violence and Society Research Group, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
  3. 3Department of Social Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, UK
  4. 4Division of Violence Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jonathan Shepherd, Violence and Society Research Group, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF14 4XY, UK; shepherdjp{at}cardiff.ac.uk
  • Received 4 October 2012
  • Revised 24 June 2013
  • Accepted 23 July 2013
  • Published Online First 18 September 2013

Abstract

Objective To assess the costs and benefits of a partnership between health services, police and local government shown to reduce violence-related injury.

Methods Benefit-cost analysis.

Results Anonymised information sharing and use led to a reduction in wounding recorded by the police that reduced the economic and social costs of violence by £6.9 million in 2007 compared with the costs the intervention city, Cardiff UK, would have experienced in the absence of the programme. This includes a gross cost reduction of £1.25 million to the health service and £1.62 million to the criminal justice system in 2007. By contrast, the costs associated with the programme were modest: setup costs of software modifications and prevention strategies were £107 769, while the annual operating costs of the system were estimated as £210 433 (2003 UK pound). The cumulative social benefit-cost ratio of the programme from 2003 to 2007 was £82 in benefits for each pound spent on the programme, including a benefit-cost ratio of 14.80 for the health service and 19.1 for the criminal justice system. Each of these benefit-cost ratios is above 1 across a wide range of sensitivity analyses.

Conclusions An effective information-sharing partnership between health services, police and local government in Cardiff, UK, led to substantial cost savings for the health service and the criminal justice system compared with 14 other cities in England and Wales designated as similar by the UK government where this intervention was not implemented.

Free sample
This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of Injury Prevention.
View free sample issue >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article