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Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study: recruitment, and participant characteristics, health and disability status
  1. Sarah Derrett1,
  2. Gabrielle Davie1,
  3. Shanthi Ameratunga2,
  4. Emma Wyeth3,
  5. Sarah Colhoun1,
  6. Suzanne Wilson1,
  7. Ari Samaranayaka1,
  8. Rebbecca Lilley1,
  9. Brendan Hokowhitu4,
  10. Paul Hansen5,
  11. John Langley1
  1. 1Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Injury Prevention Research Unit, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  2. 2School of Population Health, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  3. 3Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Te Roopū Rakahau Hauora Māori a Kāi Tahu (Ngāi Tahu Māori Health Research Unit), Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  4. 4Te Tumu-School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  5. 5Department of Economics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to Dr Sarah Derrett, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Injury Prevention Research Unit, Dunedin School of Medicine, PO Box 56, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; sarah.derrett{at}otago.ac.nz

Abstract

The Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study aims to identify predictors of disability following injury. Participants were selected from the entitlement claims register of New Zealand's no-fault compensation insurer, the Accident Compensation Corporation, and followed up by interview for 2 years. This report describes changes to intended Prospective Outcomes of Injury Study methods and key characteristics of the cohort, with an emphasis on general health and disability before injury and soon afterwards. There were 2856 injured participants in the first interview, which occurred 3.2 months (median) after injury. The recruitment period was extended to enable inclusion of sufficient Māori participants. At the first interview, most participants were experiencing worse health status and increased disability compared to before injury, despite less than one-third reporting admission to hospital because of their injury. Analysis of outcome predictors related to post-injury function, disability and return-to-work soon after injury and 1 year later is now under way.

  • Injuries
  • outcome assessment
  • cohort studies
  • prospective studies
  • methods
  • outcome evaluation
  • disability
  • functional outcome
  • longitudinal
  • methodology
  • outcome of injury
  • mechanism
  • risk/determinants
  • injury diagnosis
  • health services
  • international
  • MVTC
  • disability
  • systematic review
  • public health
  • race
  • qualitative
  • aboriginal
  • disability

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Footnotes

  • Funding This study is funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand (2007–2013) and was co-funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation, New Zealand (2007–2010). The views and conclusions expressed herein are the authors' and may not reflect those of the funders. Scholarships: Dr Wyeth was supported by a Health Research Council of New Zealand Eru Pomare Research Fellowship and Dr Lilley by an ACC Early Research Career Post-Doctoral Fellowship.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval This study was undertaken following approval from the New Zealand Health and Disability Multi-Region Ethics Committee and was approved by the ACC Research Ethics Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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