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522 Effectiveness of maternity department intervention to improve safety knowledge and behaviour of child passenger
  1. Xiangxiang Liu1,
  2. Jingzhen Yang2,
  3. Liping Li3
  1. 1Injury Prevention Research Centre, Medical College of Shantou University, China
  2. 2The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, USA
  3. 3Injury Prevention Research Centre, Medical College of Shantou University, China

Abstract

Background To test the effectiveness of maternity department intervention to improve knowledge of child passenger safety among newborn parents.

Methods A prospective experimental study which included three groups (one behaviour intervention group, one education intervention group and one control group) was conducted in the maternity department of two hospitals. Both intervention groups received a folded pamphlet of child passenger safety, a height chart and a standardised safety education during their hospital stay after giving birth. The behaviour intervention group received an additional free child car seat (CSS) and professional installation training at discharge. The control group received a pamphlet with no information on child passenger safety, a height chart or an education about infant care. Three months later, a phone interview was conducted among the participants in the three groups. Data on the child passenger safety knowledge, attitudes, and use of CSS were collected and evaluated before and after the intervention.

Results No significant difference observed in demographics among the three groups. There was a significant difference in CSS use among the three groups before and after the intervention (χ2 = 19.6109, P = 0.0001). In the behaviour intervention group, the knowledge of safety belt (χ2 = 13.1680, P=0.0003), safety airbag (χ2 = 51.0545, P = 0.0000), and CSS legislation(χ2 = 10.0838, P = 0.0015 ) increased statistically after the intervention; and the drivers wearing safety belt increased from 90% to 100%(χ2 = 5.2525, P = 0.0219); answering phone without device reduced from 29% to 4% (χ2 = 11.8837, P = 0.0006). In the education group, the knowledge of safety airbag (χ2 = 5.8667, P = 0.0154), and CSS (χ2 = 5.4363, P = 0.0197 ) increased statistically after the intervention; and the drivers wearing safety belt increased from 66% to 86% (χ2 = 5.0661, P = 0.0244). In the control group, except the statistically significant increase on the knowledge of CSS (χ2 = 4.4308, P = 0.0353 ), there was no statistically changes in other study measures; and the drivers wearing safety belt increased from 75% to 95% (χ2 = 6.400, P = 0.0114).

Conclusion Lack of knowledge and poor perception contributed to low use of CSS. Interventions that combine a free CSS with child passenger safety education were effective in improving newborn parents’ knowledge and use of CSS. The results of this study will be useful in development of effective interventions promoting child passenger safety.

  • Child passenger safety
  • CSS
  • Newborn parents
  • Education intervention

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