Article Text

PDF
Scared safe? Abandoning the use of fear in urban violence prevention programmes
  1. Jonathan Purtle1,
  2. Rose Cheney2,
  3. Douglas J Wiebe3,
  4. Rochelle Dicker4
  1. 1Department of Health Management & Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  2. 2Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  3. 3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  4. 4Department of General Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Fransisco, California, USA
  1. Corespondence to
    Jonathan Purtle, Department of Health Management & Policy, Drexel University School of Public Health, 3215 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Jonathan.Purtle{at}Drexel.edu

Statistics from Altmetric.com

The American College of Surgeons’ (ACS) Committee on Trauma recently released Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient 2014.1 Now in its sixth edition, Resources enumerates the criteria that US trauma centres must satisfy to achieve ACS verification. Of particular relevance to the field of violence and injury research is Chapter 18, entitled ‘Prevention’. Among the many changes is the addition of criterion 18-5, which states: “Level I and II trauma centers must implement at least two programs that address one of the major causes of injury in the community” (p. 141). Violence is a major cause of injury in the communities served by urban trauma centres,2 ,3 and thus violence is likely to be the focus of many new programmes established to satisfy the criterion. This presents an opportunity to integrate violent injury research into practice as most trauma centres will adopt existing models of hospital-based violence prevention.

Given that criterion 18-5 functions as an unfunded mandate, and that resources dedicated to prevention activities are limited in most trauma centres,4 preference will likely be given to injury prevention programmes with relatively low costs. Programmes that use fear appeal are not very …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.