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SPECIFICITY OF POST-CONCUSSION SYMPTOMS AT 3 MONTHS AFTER MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. RESULTS FROM A PROSPECTIVE STUDY
  1. E Lagarde1,2,
  2. F Masson1,2,3,
  3. R Ribéreau-Gayon1,2,3,
  4. D Zongo1,2,
  5. L -R Salmi1,2,3,
  6. M Laborey1,2
  1. 1University Bordeaux, ISPED, INSERM U897 Research Centre ‘Epidemiology and Biostatistics’, Bordeaux, France
  2. 2INSERM, ISPED, Injury Prevention and Control Research Team, INSERM U897, Bordeaux, France
  3. 3University Hospital Pellegrin, Bordeaux, France

    Abstract

    Background Common complaints after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) include headaches, anxiety, irritability, and sleep disturbances, but these symptoms also occur in the non head-injured population. Whether they are more frequent among MTBI patients should help identify those that could be considered as part of the post concussion syndrome (PCS).

    Aims/Objectives/Purpose We assessed the specificity of symptoms proposed in the three main scales used to measure PCS: post concussion symptoms listed in the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), and the 10th International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10).

    Methods A cohort of 536 patients with MTBI and a comparison group of 946 patients with non-head injuries were recruited in the Adult Emergency Department (ED) of a teaching hospital in Bordeaux, France. Specificity of symptoms was assessed comparing MTBI and comparison patients at 3 months taking in to account baseline levels before ED admission.

    Results/Outcomes 8 symptoms were identified as being specific to MTBI: headaches, dizziness, intolerance of stress, forgetfulness, poor concentration, taking longer to think, blurred vision, and personality change. Eight symptoms were found to be not specific to MTBI: nausea, noise sensitivity, irritability, anxiety, feeling frustrated, double vision, light sensitivity and restlessness.

    Significance/Contribution to the Field The relevance of symptoms proposed to constitute PCS should be reviewed. A more specific definition of PCS would make diagnosis easier and facilitate prevention as well as treatment of patients with MTBI.

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