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PREVENTING RISKY DRIVING AND ALCOHOL MISUSE AMONG YOUNG ADULTS: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT
  1. M Sommers1,
  2. M Lyons2,
  3. J Shope3,
  4. B Sommers4,
  5. K McDonald1,
  6. J Fargo5
  1. 1University of Pennsylvania
  2. 2University of Cincinnati
  3. 3University of Michigan
  4. 4Harvard University
  5. 5Utah State University

    Abstract

    Background Emergency department (ED) visits provide an opportunity to reduce risky driving and alcohol misuse, thereby reducing the risk for future injury.

    Aims/Objectives/Purpose To determine the efficacy of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) addressing risky driving and alcohol misuse.

    Methods We implemented a randomised controlled trial of SBIRT with follow-up through 12 months. ED patients (N=20 027) ages 18–44 were screened for risky driving and alcohol misuse. Participants who screened positive for both behaviours (n=476) were randomised to brief intervention (BIG), contact-control (CCG), or no-contact-control (NCG) groups. BIG (n=150) received screening, a 20-min assessment, and two, 20-min interventions. CCG (n=162) received screening and a 20-min assessment and NCG (n=164) received screening and were interviewed at 12 months. Outcome measures included self-reported driving behaviours (safety belt use, speeding >20 mph above speed limit) and alcohol consumption (≥5 standard drinks/day, maximum drinks/6-h period).

    Results/Outcomes Three primary outcomes were significantly lower (p<0.05) in BIG compared to CCG through 6 or 9 months, but not at 12 months: Safety belt use at 3, 6, and 9 months (6% increase for BIG, but a 11% decrease for CCG); maximum number of drinks in a 6-h period at 3 and 6 months (20% decrease for BIG, but only 11% for CCG); and ≥5 standard drinks/day at 3 and 6 months (18% decrease for BIG, but only 10% for CCG).

    Significance/Contribution to the Field SBIRT can reduce risky driving and alcohol misuse, but its effects did not persist after 9 months.

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