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Exploring child car passenger safety practices in China: experience from a parental survey in Shanghai
  1. Shuming Pan1,2,
  2. Wei Du3,4,5,
  3. Fan Jiang2,6,
  4. Lynne E Bilston3,7,
  5. Julie Brown3,8,
  6. Xiaoming Shen2
  1. 1Emergency Department, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  2. 2Shanghai Paediatric Research Institute, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Shanghai, China
  3. 3Neuroscience Research Australia, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  4. 4Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China
  5. 5The George Institute for International Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  6. 6Department of Developmental and Behavioural Paediatrics, Shanghai Children's Medical Centre, Shanghai, China
  7. 7Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  8. 8School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Xiaoming Shen, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute for Paediatric Research, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Shanghai 200092, China; xmshen{at}shsmu.edu.cn

Abstract

Little is known about child passenger safety practice in China. This study aims to describe child passenger seating and restraint practice in Shanghai. Information on 970 children enrolled in five randomly selected kindergartens in the Songjiang and Pudong districts of Shanghai was collected from a parental survey during 2008–2009. The adjusted rate ratios for optimal (rear-seated alone) versus suboptimal seating position (including front-seated or sitting in adult laps) and restraint use versus non-use of restraints among child passengers were evaluated using multivariate binomial regression. Suboptimal seating position (16.9%) and non-use of restraints (60.8%) was common among child passengers. Younger age (≤4 years) and having parents who are licensed drivers decreased the likelihood of being rear-seated alone; whereas having a tertiary-educated mother increased the likelihood of a child being seated optimally. Compared with unlicensed parents, guardian parents who have a driver's licence were more likely to use restraints for their child passengers. This study suggests restraint non-use and suboptimal seating position are common for child passengers in the Songjiang and Pudong districts of Shanghai, and identifies risk factors influencing restraint use and seating position choice for child passengers. There is an urgent need to improve child passenger safety in China and these findings indicate potential targets for educational interventions in the absence of child restraint laws.

  • Child car passengers
  • seating position
  • child restraints
  • safety practice
  • motor vehicle
  • occupant
  • epidemiology
  • statistical issues
  • child
  • engineering
  • spinal cord
  • restraint
  • head injury
  • MVTC
  • standards
  • passenger
  • child
  • equipment

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Footnotes

  • Funding WD is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Australia–China exchange fellowship. LEB is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council senior research fellowship. JB is supported by an Australian Research Council Fellowship. Funding was provided by Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, the Non-Governmental International Cooperation Program of Shanghai Science and Technology Commission and the Faculty of Medicine of Shanghai Jiaotong University.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval Ethics approval was provided by Shanghai Jiaotong University.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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