Article Text

PDF
Young Egyptians' perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of injuries
  1. Hannah R Day1,
  2. Maged El-Setouhy2,
  3. Mohamed El-Shinawi3,
  4. Amr Assem4,
  5. Mona Ismail4,
  6. Marwa Salem4,
  7. Gordon S Smith1,5,
  8. Jon Mark Hirshon1,5,6
  1. 1Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Department of Community, Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
  3. 3Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
  4. 4Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  5. 5Charles McC Mathias Jr National Study Center for Trauma and EMS, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  6. 6Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to Hannah R Day, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, 685 W. Baltimore Street, Room 360, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; hday{at}epi.umaryland.edu

Abstract

The objective of this study was to qualitatively evaluate young Egyptians' perceptions, attitudes, knowledge and behaviour towards injuries before implementation of an extensive questionnaire about injuries among Egyptian youth. In 2008, five focus groups of three to nine participants each were conducted in Cairo, Egypt in Arabic to evaluate young Egyptians' attitudes towards injuries, injury prevention, and their understanding of ‘accidents’ and fatalism. Participants were 14–26 years of age and were from medium to high socioeconomic status. Focus group participants noted that the concept of hadthah (‘accident’) signified an event determined by destiny, whereas esabah (‘injury’) was the result of human actions. The results of these focus groups indicate that young, educated Egyptians are interested in injury prevention programmes despite low confidence in the preventability of injuries.

  • Egypt
  • adolescent
  • focus groups
  • knowledge
  • attitude
  • qualitative

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding This work was supported by a Junior Scientist Development Visit Grant Award, USDA award number 58-3148-8-109, and Fogarty Grant 5D43TW007296. Other Funders: NIH; USDA.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by the institutional review boards at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.