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Injury-related hospitalisations in a rural county of southern China, 1994–2005
  1. M Zhu1,2,
  2. L Li3,
  3. X Liu3,
  4. D Zhao3,
  5. W Lin4
  1. 1
    Department of Community Medicine and Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA
  2. 2
    PO Box 9151, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA
  3. 3
    Shantou University Medical College, Injury Prevention Research Center, Shantou, Guangdong Province, China
  4. 4
    Nan-Ao County People’s Hospital, Nan-Ao, Guangdong Province, China
  1. Correspondence to Dr L Li, No 22 Xinling Road, Shantou City, Guangdong Province, 515041, China; lpli{at}stu.edu.cn

Abstract

Injury-related hospitalisations in a rural county in China from 1994 to 2005 were analysed for trend and rate by demographics. Traffic-related hospitalisation increased from 25.5 per 100 000 in 1994–1996 to 57.9 in 2003–2005, and overtook assaults as the leading cause of injury. Motorcyclists, pedestrians and bicyclists accounted for 41%, 22% and 19% of traffic-related hospitalisations. Compared with females, males had a higher risk of traffic-related hospitalisations (rate ratio (RR) 2.38, 95% CI 1.89 to 3.00), falls (RR 1.64, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.42) and assaults (RR 4.29, 95% CI 3.23 to 5.69). Relative to 25–59-year-olds, 15–24-year-olds were at increased risk of traffic crashes (RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.37 to 2.25) and assaults (RR 1.56, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.01), and adults aged 60 years or older were at increased risk of falls (RR 2.58, 95% CI 1.61 to 4.14). Priority should be given to prevention of traffic injuries among motorcyclists, pedestrians and bicyclists, assaults among male adolescents and young adults, and falls among older adults.

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Footnotes

  • Chinese version available online at http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/vol15/issue6

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethics approval Shantou University Medical College and Nan-Ao County People’s Hospital, China.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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